24 4 / 2014

If someone would’ve shown me this Buzzfeed GIF set when I was in middle school or high school, I might’ve considered a career in science much sooner. Also, No. 17 (pictured above) is relevant to my current module, which I’ve nicknamed, “How babies are made, plus gross stuff that can happen to your baby-making machinery.”

22 4 / 2014

Some of us are learning about the histology of the prostate, while others are competing in the Dolphin Olympics.

Some of us are learning about the histology of the prostate, while others are competing in the Dolphin Olympics.

22 4 / 2014

One of my designer friends sent this to me, and I find it uncanny that the further I get into medical school, the more closely my handwriting resembles this image.

One of my designer friends sent this to me, and I find it uncanny that the further I get into medical school, the more closely my handwriting resembles this image.

17 4 / 2014

We just learned about Nutcracker Syndrome this week, and I assumed its name was derived from the fact that it causes dilatation of testicular veins, resulting in a scrotal varicocele. As it turns out, the “nutcracker” reference has nothing to do with the syndrome’s effect on the scrotum. My bad. Read on…
medicalschool:

Nutcracker syndrome (NCS) results most commonly from the compression of the left renal vein between the abdominal aorta (AA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), although other variants exist. The name derives from the fact that, in the sagittal plane and/or transverse plane, the SMA and AA (with some imagination) appear to be a nutcracker crushing a nut (the renal vein). There is a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and diagnostic criteria are not well defined, which frequently results in delayed or incorrect diagnosis.This condition is not to be confused with superior mesenteric artery syndrome, which is the compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the SMA and the AA.

We just learned about Nutcracker Syndrome this week, and I assumed its name was derived from the fact that it causes dilatation of testicular veins, resulting in a scrotal varicocele. As it turns out, the “nutcracker” reference has nothing to do with the syndrome’s effect on the scrotum. My bad. Read on…

medicalschool:

Nutcracker syndrome (NCS) results most commonly from the compression of the left renal vein between the abdominal aorta (AA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA), although other variants exist. The name derives from the fact that, in the sagittal plane and/or transverse plane, the SMA and AA (with some imagination) appear to be a nutcracker crushing a nut (the renal vein). There is a wide spectrum of clinical presentations and diagnostic criteria are not well defined, which frequently results in delayed or incorrect diagnosis.This condition is not to be confused with superior mesenteric artery syndrome, which is the compression of the third portion of the duodenum by the SMA and the AA.

(Source: Wikipedia)

17 4 / 2014

Mondays of the first week of a module are always the worst. They are so bad, in fact, that it is Thursday and I am just now finally coming up for air and taking a break to tell you about Monday. (If we’re getting picky, it’s April, and I’m pretty sure I never told you about January, but you’re smart. I know you’ll catch up quickly.)

The problem with the Monday of the first week of the module is that we’re tackling an entirely different system of the body than in previous modules, complete with totally foreign language (zona pellucida, ischiocavernosus and dihydrotestosterone are among this week’s words) and long lists of anatomy memorization and identification. On the bright side, I am already experiencing first-hand the real world application of my broadening vocabulary—last night my Scrabble queue was one letter short of spelling “alveoli,” which would’ve been a killer seven-letter masterpiece, for sure.

Anyway, aside from having to Google my way through the terminology, the first week is also the toughest because we have little or no base when it comes to learning about the module’s organ system. We begin by learning the basic physiology, histology and anatomy from scratch. Weeks two and three run more smoothly because we’ve laid the groundwork and are building on top of it with related pathology—for me, the knowledge learned in the first week is solidified when I pair with it how and why, in some cases, the body just doesn’t function as it should.

Hopefully these next few weeks will shed light on the overload of material that just doesn’t seem to stick during the first few days of every new module. In the meantime, if you need me, I’ll be memorizing reproductive anatomy and/or planning my impending summer vacation. 

(Source: allisoneargent, via bossypants)

14 4 / 2014

You guys know I love TV, and that I’ll take just about any chance to defend it. Today in class we talked about the recent national decline in teen pregnancies, and I was reminded about this article re: MTV’s influence via “16 and Pregnant” and “Teen Mom.” I’ve lived vicariously through the cautionary tales of the “Teen Mom” cast for a few years now, and I can promise you it is some of the best birth control I’ve ever taken.

13 4 / 2014

This article reminds me that being a good physician is about so much more than being a smarty pants scientist.

11 4 / 2014

10 4 / 2014

It’s National Sibling Day, and mine’s the best.

It’s National Sibling Day, and mine’s the best.

08 4 / 2014

"Can’t get enough" has been my study mantra this past week, and guess what, it paid off in major points! I did well enough on today’s test that I don’t have to participate in Thursday’s retake, and I can bask in a super-long weekend.

You might be wondering what’s on the docket for my five-day hiatus, and though I haven’t planned past this afternoon’s haircut and eyebrow wax, I can tell you it will likely involve soaking up some sunshine, cleaning my room and relaxing with my stories. Perfection.

"Can’t get enough" has been my study mantra this past week, and guess what, it paid off in major points! I did well enough on today’s test that I don’t have to participate in Thursday’s retake, and I can bask in a super-long weekend.

You might be wondering what’s on the docket for my five-day hiatus, and though I haven’t planned past this afternoon’s haircut and eyebrow wax, I can tell you it will likely involve soaking up some sunshine, cleaning my room and relaxing with my stories. Perfection.